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A couple of days ago, I was on the top deck of a bus going up Camden High Street and noticed one of these ghost signs for the first time. I have been travelling that route on a very regular basis, by foot or bus, for 35 years! What is worse is that when we took a walk down to take a photo, we noticed the 3 others for the first time! I like to think that I am quite observant … clearly not! Two of the ghost signs above shops at the bottom end of the High Street are very faded, as is the sign above Mornington Crescent tube station which is only visible at an angle. Fortunately, there is a clearer picture and very good description of the advertisement at: http://paintedsignsandmosaics.blogspot.com/2010/06/george-clark-sons-breakfast-food.html. We then continued down Hampstead Road passing the old Carrera cigarette factory which closed in the 1960s and was stripped of its glorious Egyptian – revival style and iconic black cats at the entrance. It was restored to its former glory in the late 1990s and is now Greater London House, home to various offices and a gym (more detail here: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/black-cats-of-carreras-cigarette-factory).  Continuing south you can’t help but notice the desolation caused by HS2 and the gaping hole that was, until last year, The National Temperance Hospital. There is information about the hospital here with great photographs here: https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/nationaltemperance.html. Next to the hospital site is the very fine red brick building which was built to replace the original Saint Pancras Female Orphanage in 1904 (http://www.childrenshomes.org.uk/StPancrasFemale/)  Opposite the orphanage is a mid 1860s, Grade II listed pub, which was then called The Prince of Wales and down the right hand side of which is Prince of Wales Passage. Being curious sorts, we went to have a look and in the overhang of the buttresses found the two, beautiful etched glass windows. Back across Hampstead Road, down a path behind the Sari Centre (with a vintage looking piece of street art on the wall, partially over-painted), we emerged into Drummond Street, famous for its excellent Indian restaurants, though sadly, not for much longer as the HS2 destruction continues. Round the corner of the derelict tube station entrance, Euston Station and the bus home!